The Economist-Nielsen Data Visualization Challenge Finalists

This Challenge asked the World to review Nielsen consumer data, generate insightful conclusions with broad implications, and present a compelling visual presentation of the most interesting ideas from the data. Over 4,000 Solvers from 101 countries signed up to participate in the Challenge, and of the hundreds of Solvers from around the globe who provided a solution, seven were chosen as finalists. The winning team was announced at The Economist World in 2013 Festival in New York City on December 8, 2012.

 

 Challenge Winner: Bogdan and Stephanie Yamkovenko

 

Names: Bogdan and Stephanie Yamkovenko
Country: United States

View Submission: Click here to view

View Video of the Winners: Click here to view

Background: Bogdan Yamkovenko, PhD, is a researcher and assistant professor of human resource development at Rochester Institute of Technology. Bogdan is interested in studying how analytics can solve human capital problems, drawing on his experience at a Fortune 500 company and a global management consulting company. In addition, Bogdan is researching how various types of goals and motivations affect performance in complex and independent tasks.

Stephanie Yamkovenko is a journalist, currently reporting on health care policy and practice in the Washington, D.C. area. Stephanie has a master’s degree in journalism and takes her profession’s role of the fourth estate very seriously. Stephanie’s news writing experience spans multiple fields and publications, and she is always looking for new freelance writing opportunities. Follow her on Twitter @S_Yamkovenko.

Idea Behind the Visualization:
  “In looking at the global perceptions in the data provided for the Challenge, we noticed that certain countries (such as Saudi Arabia, China, and UAE) seemed overly confident in their economy. To provide more context and depth, we supplemented the data with unemployment, debt, and the Press Freedom Index. Interestingly, we found that the consumer confidence index is not just a function of economic indicators — democracy also plays an important role. When a government controls the press, it can paint a rosy picture of its economy. We found that countries with the highest confidence also have the most restricted press. However, the Internet and social media may be game changers. As the data indicate, people want honest information. If they cannot get it from their country’s press, they will turn to the Internet and social media to find it.”

Thoughts on The Economist-Nielsen Data Visualization Challenge:
  “The Economist-Nielsen Data Visualization Challenge allowed the two of us to collaborate by combining our skills. We were excited to have thought of a unique way to visualize the data and tell a story with broad implications. This is a great example of how Challenges such as these can bring together varied perspectives and skills into one coherent solution.”

 

Finalist: John Oquist

 

Name: John Oquist
Country: United States

View Submission: Click here to view

Background: John Oquist is a motion designer based in New York City, focused on using visualizations and animation to improve how complex topics are understood. His work can be seen at www.ibuildworlds.com.

Idea Behind the Visualization:
“The Nielsen Global Consumer Confidence and Global AdView Pulse reports contain economic and behavioral data from markets spread around the globe. Motion graphics and data visualization can quickly familiarize viewers with what and who these numbers represent. Marrying Nielsen’s data to geographic maps, this fluid animation guides the viewer through a description of surveyed markets, economic outlooks, and an overview of Consumer Confidence and ad spending, in order to provide a snapshot of the wealth of economic data. Information was also organized in such a way that stills from the video can stand as infographics on their own.”

Thoughts on The Economist-Nielsen Data Visualization Challenge:
“New forms of media such as information design can offer important insights into large datasets, often in aesthetically beautiful ways. The Economist-Nielsen Challenge provided pertinent market data from two highly-respected players in global business with which to experiment and create graphically interesting, explanatory visualizations.”

 

Finalist: Rohit Badola

 

Name: Rohit Badola
Country: United States

View Submission: Click here to view

Background: Rohit Badola is an engineer with many years’ experience in the automotive and consumer products industries. Most recently he worked at Intertek where he managed the McDonald's Happy Meal safety testing program. He has an MBA from DePaul University and recently obtained his PMP certification for project management.  Hobbies include photography and creating promotional sales videos for websites to help clients communicate their message visually.

Idea Behind the Visualization:
  “Wading through the weeds of the large quantity of data provided, I was interested by the geographic usage of the Internet and the fact that those regions that have had the Internet the longest are the least influenced by it. The newness of technology is certainly a factor in its adoption. My trips to China reinforced the observation about the importance of social media in making purchasing decisions in Asia-Pacific. The economic crisis is top of mind for almost everyone and I wanted to emphasize that as well. I used video-typography as a way of communicating this information.”

 

Finalist: Stuart Inskip, Ian Klein, and Luis Liwag

 

Names: Stuart Inskip, Ian Klein, and Luis Liwag
Country: United States

View Submission: Click here to view

Background: The team is comprised of three colleagues from the Southern California creative agency, Column Five, which specializes in data visualization, motion graphics, and visual content development. For more information about their agency, visit http://columnfivemedia.com.

Developer, Stuart Inskip (left) is a programmer, runner, and the writer of the California Gothic series: Personal Jesus, The God of Las Vegas, and The Goddess of Los Angeles. @stuartinskip

Producer, Ian Klein (center) studied dramaturgy at Columbia University. In addition to his work in narrative development, he is a frequent contributor to popular culture studies. @eincline

Designer, Luis Liwag (right) has been working as a professional graphic designer for over three years. His company U.L.A.M. showcases his passion for illustration and typography. @luisakamikko

Idea Behind the Visualization: “Ad Infinitum: Global Advertising Spend” is the result of a collaborative effort to grant users a seamless, vibrant experience of a subject that has some bearing on just about everyone in the world. Given a choice between working with the Nielsen Global AdView Pulse or the company’s Consumer Confidence Index, it was determined the former would allow for the most compelling, comprehensive visualization. The design stemmed from a desire to display the information in an intuitive and inviting way that would also appeal to a broader audience than perhaps that which would typically encounter this kind of data.”

Thoughts on The Economist-Nielsen Data Visualization Challenge:The Economist-Nielsen Data Visualization Challenge prompted Solvers to free data from the confines of a spreadsheet and make it beautiful. Yet the combination of data and design is about more than aesthetics – it’s about putting the world into perspective in line with an aspirational quality that incites people to action and new ways of thinking about their role as human beings in every sector of their lives.”

 

Finalist: Fred Sham

 

Name: Fred Sham
Country: United States

View Submission: Click here to view

Background: Originally from Vancouver, Canada, Fred currently resides in New York City and works as a planning analyst for Lower Manhattan's business improvement district. He is passionate about understanding and representing human centered issues through the use of design. As an advocate of systems thinking, he uses both data-driven and participatory methodologies in his research. Fred holds a MSc in Urban Planning from Columbia University, and a BA in Human Geography from the University of British Columbia.

Idea Behind the Visualization:
“Through an infographic, my solution seeks to link growing consumer confidence in the emerging economies of the Middle East & Africa, Latin America, and Asia to increasing ad spend in these regions. Moreover, as Internet penetration continues to grow at colossal rates in these regions, ad spend is increasingly being devoted to using the Internet as a medium of outreach. As these emerging markets continue to gain unprecedented spending power and become increasingly entwined with digital media, it becomes even more important for advertisers to not only continue to invest in online and social media, but also develop strategies to engage in authentic dialogues with their consumers in this new age of consumer experience and advertising.”

Thoughts on The Economist-Nielsen Data Visualization Challenge:
“This Challenge is a prime example of how design can transform complex data from an otherwise challenging form into a compelling product that engages with and is accessible to a wide audience. Facilitating this engagement is critical, as it not only provides us with an opportunity to understand issues from multiple perspectives, but also encourages more people to explore ideas and develop innovations which otherwise may not have been thought about.”

 

Finalist: Harald Tammen

 

Name: Harald Tammen
Country: Germany

View Submission: Click here to view

Background: Harald Tammen received his MD from the University of Hanover in Germany and completed his PhD at the Lower Saxony Institute of Peptide Research. Since September 2000, he has been working as a Senior Scientist and Project Leader in Medical Research. He is responsible for the successful performance of pre-clinical research projects in both the EU and United States.

Idea Behind the Visualization:
“A multivariate approach was used to develop an incentive score based on results from the questionnaires. The incentive score describes the likeliness of future purchases. The result was compared to the provided Consumer Confidence Index and revealed a very strong correlation indicating the validity of the incentive score. The main conclusion of the data analysis is the presence of a discrepancy between a mid-high Consumer Confidence Index and low incentives in "western" countries and Japan. This may be mirroring the current economic situation and may impact the effects of ad spending.”

Thoughts on The Economist-Nielsen Data Visualization Challenge:
"The Economist-Nielsen Data Visualization Challenge catalyzes clear presentations of comprehensive data to convey meaningful insights for people."

 

Finalist: Pedro Tarrisse

 

Name: Pedro Tarrisse
Country: United States

View Submission: Click here to view

Background:
Pedro Tarrisse studied International Relations in Brasilia and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He currently works on development in Haiti.

Idea Behind the Visualization: 
“Emerging market consumers are more confident about the economy and more likely to make a purchase based on social media or online reviews. Additionally, ad spending has increased the most in these countries, while stagnating or shrinking in developed countries. I created a spiral graph that arranged countries clockwise according to the combined rates of those likely to make a purchase based on social media or online reviews on the outside, and consumer confidence on the inside, color coded to show changes in ad spending.”

Thoughts on The Economist-Nielsen Data Visualization Challenge: 
“Crowdsourcing data visualization can be fun and useful.”

  

Are you a creative, passionate individual with great ideas? As a Solver, you can apply your expertise to important problems, stretch your creative boundaries, and win cash awards ranging from $500 to $1,000,000.

 

Click here to become a Solver today!